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Seth's Book Recommendations
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Updated June 2001

Information Architecture, Design, and Style

  • Information Architecture for the World Wide Web, by Louis Rosenfeld and Peter Morville (O'Reilly & Associates, 1998). Effective approaches for designers, information architects, and website managers. Learn how to design websites and intranets that support growth, management, navigation, and ease of use.
     
  • Web Navigation: Designing the User Experience, by Jennifer Fleming (O'Reilly & Associates, 1998). The first in-depth look at designing website navigation, including strategies and methodologies for developing solutions to your unique situation. CD-ROM included.
     
  • Web Design in a Nutshell: A Desktop Quick Reference, by Jennifer Niederst (O'Reilly & Associates, 1999). The nitty-gritty on everything you need to know to design web pages. This book provides quick access to the wide range of front-end technologies and techniques from which Web designers and authors must draw.
     
  • Web Style Guide: Basic Design Principles for Creating Web Sites, by Patrick J. Lynch and Sarah Horton (Yale University Press, 1999). Offers clear, concise advice on creating well-designed and effective websites and pages. Focusing on the interface and graphic design principles that underlie the best Web site design, the book provides expert guidance on issues ranging from planning and organizing goals to design strategies for a site to the elements of individual page design.
     
  • Designing the User Interface: Strategies for Effective Human-Computer Interaction, 3rd edition, by Ben Shneiderman (Addison Wesley Longman, 1998). A complete, current, and authoritative introduction to user-interface design. The author discusses the principles and practices needed to design such effective interaction, and offers practical techniques and guidelines for interface design. Shneiderman also takes great care to discuss underlying issues and to support conclusions with empirical results.
     
  • The Elements of User Interface Design, by Theo Mandel (Wiley, John & Sons, 1997). Covers the basics of effective user interface design and demonstrates different techniques. Divided into three parts, the book first teaches readers the foundations and fundamentals, then shows them how to use those basics to create interfaces, and finally discusses advanced topics and emerging technologies like object-oriented user interfaces (OOUIs), voice activation, and Wizards.
     
  • Information Architects, by Richard Saul Wurman (Graphis U.S., Inc.). There is a new breed of graphic designers, exhibition designers, illustrators and photographers, whose passion it is to make the complex clear. I call this new breed of talented thinkers Information Architects and this book was created to help celebrate and understand the importance of their work - a work which inspires hope that as we expand our capabilities to inform and communicate that we will value, with equal enthusiasm, the design of understanding.
     

Project Management

Indexing

  • Read Me First! A Style Guide for the Computer Industry, by Sun Technical Publications (1996). Chapter 9 is a clear and detailed introduction to indexing.
     
  • The Art of Indexing, by Larry Bonura (Wiley, 1994). An "instant" course in indexing for anyone who doesn't have the time for anything but the practicalities. Discusses the function of an index, teaches you how to estimate indexing time, shows how to select entries and subentries, covers indexing for online documents, and more.
     
  • Indexing Books, by Nancy C. Mulvany (University of Chicago, 1993). A much-needed guide to printed index preparation that is thorough, accessible, well organized, and up-to-date. The most extensive and up-to-date reference available, this will become the standard indexing guide for authors, technical writers, editors, beginning and advanced professional indexers, and all others involved in writing and publishing nonfiction books.
     
  • Indexing A to Z, 2nd edition, by Wans H. Wellisch (H.W. Wilson, 1996).
  • A solid reference to writing practical, printed indexes.
     
  • Beyond Book Indexing. An excellent collection of articles, with a focus toward indexers, about indexing and the indexing lifestyle has changed thanks to the Internet and related technologies. (Seth Maislin's article will be available at this website shortly.)
The above indexing texts are Seth's recommendations. A complete list of indexing references is presented by the American Society of Indexers.

Web Programming

  • HTML: The Definitive Guide, 3rd edition, by Chuck Musciano (O'Reilly & Associates, 1998). The most comprehensive book available on HTML today. Covers every element of HTML in detail, explaining how each element works and how it interacts with other elements. Hints about HTML style and examples help you write documents ranging from simple online documentation to complex marketing and sales presentations.
     
  • Cascading Style Sheets: The Definitive Guide, by Eric A. Meyer (O'Reilly & Associates, 2000). Another comprehensive O'Reilly work, this time covering CSS in great detail. The one and only CSS-dedicated reference book I own.
     
  • JavaScript: The Definitive Guide, 3rd edition, by David Flanagan and Dan Shafer (O'Reilly & Associates, 1998). A thorough description of the core JavaScript language and its client-side framework, complete with sophisticated examples that show you how to handle common tasks like validating form data, working with cookies, and creating cross-browser dynamic content. This book is an indispensable reference for all JavaScript programmers, regardless of experience level.
     

Online and Information Culture

  • Data Smog, by David Shenk (Harper San Franscisco, 1998). Are you amazed at the reams of information that new technologies have made available to you? A little overwhelmed by all the data you have to wade through to find what you're looking for? Shenk declares that the information glut is causing such problems as social fragmentation, the breakdown of democracy, the decline of educational standards, and the empowerment of demagogues.
     
  • The Future Does Not Compute, by Steven L. Talbott (O'Reilly & Associates, 1995). What will embracing the Internet culture mean for our humanity? Is the Net a way of extending who we are, or surrendering? Are we opening the way to a more humane world, or are we mechanizing our communities? (Seth's Note: This is one my favorite nonfiction books ever.)
     
  • Information Architects, by Richard Saul Wurman (Graphis U.S., Inc.). There is a new breed of graphic designers, exhibition designers, illustrators and photographers, whose passion it is to make the complex clear. I call this new breed of talented thinkers Information Architects and this book was created to help celebrate and understand the importance of their work - a work which inspires hope that as we expand our capabilities to inform and communicate that we will value, with equal enthusiasm, the design of understanding.
     

Other Titles I Felt Like Putting on This Page

  • Noah's Ark: Mini House Book, by Peter J. Lippman (Workman Publishing Company Inc., 1994). This is the book that I use when I want to demonstrate how the Web is different from books. This book is a house! It has a linear story, but a nonlinear design.
     


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